The BreadCast
Daily Exposition of the Readings of Catholic Mass, from the book 'Our Daily Bread' by James H. Kurt (now with Chanted Verses, and added text of Prayer for the Day). Additional cast - SaintsCast, entries from the book 'Prayers to the Saints' (also by James Kurt). Both books bear imprimatur.

(Ruth 2:1-3,8-11,4:13-17;   Ps.128:1-5;   Mt.23:1-12)

“The greatest among you will be the one who serves the rest.”

Today we can contrast the faith of Ruth with the Pharisees’ of Jesus’ time.  In our first reading, Ruth says to her mother-in-law Naomi, “Let me go and glean ears of grain in the field of anyone who will allow me that favor.”  She puts herself at ready service in all humility, despite the potential dangers that come with being a foreign woman working in a place dominated by men who may not have the greatest of respect for women in general and especially for her.  In contrast, in our gospel Jesus says of the Pharisees, “They bind up heavy loads, hard to carry, to lay on other men’s shoulders, while they themselves will not lift a finger to budge them.”  These Pharisees have no heart for service; they are sooner the oppressors of the poor and vulnerable, and are rather concerned for “places of honor at banquets” and “marks of respect in public” than the needs of others.  How stark the contrast is between she who serves and those who are inflated with pride.

And how true are Jesus’ words: “Whoever exalts himself shall be humbled, but whoever humbles himself shall be exalted.”  Indeed, God’s providential hand watches over Ruth as she gleans in the field that “happened to be the section belonging to Boaz of the clan of Elimalech,” her father-in-law, and so a close kinsman.  Not only does Boaz make provision for her safe and fruitful gleaning of his fields – instructing his young men to do her “no harm” and indeed to leave food behind that it will be easy for her to gather – but he seeks diligently to take her to wife… and through their union she (and Naomi) is blessed with a son who will be grandfather to King David.  But what of these Pharisees and their vanity?  From them Jesus will take the keys of the kingdom, the teaching authority on earth which they so misuse for their own gain, and give it to others as He builds His Church on Peter and the apostles.  And so today we hold up Ruth as a model of faith, while these dead men’s bones which walked the earth in whitewashed tombs now find their home rotting in the grave. 

“You shall eat the fruit of your handiwork,” our psalm proclaims.  Those like Ruth who “fear the Lord, who walk in His ways… shall be like a fruitful vine” and their “children like olive plants around” their table.  However, those inflated with pride, serving no one but themselves, shall come to naught.  Let us heed our Lord’s warning today not to exalt ourselves in any work we do, but rather set our hearts on serving others.  Then we shall truly be fruitful, for then we shall know the fruits of heaven.

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O LORD, you bless all those who fear you,

who are humble before you.

YHWH, make us humble before you and before others, ever willing to serve in your NAME.  Then we shall be blessed.  Then we shall find our place in your kingdom.  For then we shall be fruitful and our fruits shall raise us to you.

Anyone to whom you lead us, let us serve, dear LORD.  Guide our steps to the field where we shall glean grain for food that will sustain us all our days.  You alone are our nourishment, and fed by your hand we shall have abundance.

But if into pride we fall, exalting ourselves above others, assuming the place reserved for you and your Son, how we shall be cast down!  Our hearts and our hands will be empty as our deeds: our vanity will spell our end.  No fruit of any worth shall we bear, and so our souls shall starve for want of love.  O LORD, let us be truly humble!  Let us be like you.

Direct download: BC-082011-Sa_20_OT_I.mp3
Category:Daily BreadCasts -- posted at: 12:00pm EDT