The BreadCast
Daily Exposition of the Readings of Catholic Mass, from the book 'Our Daily Bread' by James H. Kurt (now with Chanted Verses, and added text of Prayer for the Day). Additional cast - SaintsCast, entries from the book 'Prayers to the Saints' (also by James Kurt). Both books bear imprimatur.

(Ec.11:9-12:8;   Ps.90:1,3-6,12-14,17;   Lk.9:43-45)

 

“The dust returns to the earth as it once was,

and the life breath returns to God who gave it.”

 

“As a watch of the night” is our life, passing unnoticed while souls slumber.  “You make an end of them in their sleep,” Psalm 90 prophesies (as we hear the same verses of this same psalm for the second time in three days); indeed man lies unaware of his coming death, ignorant of the day which passes.  For though in our youth we “follow the ways of [our] heart, the vision of [our] eyes,” and seem to “ward off grief” at will, yet “the next morning [we] are like the changing grass”; so quickly does our flower fade.  And so little of this do we see.

In our gospel the Lord speaks again to His disciples of His imminent death, and so, really, the death we all must undergo; but though He makes a clear point that they should listen carefully, saying, “Pay close attention to what I tell you,” yet they seem unable to hear His words.  Our gospel tells us, “They failed… to understand this warning; its meaning was so concealed from them they did not grasp it at all.”  He repeats what He has said before in no uncertain terms, and yet they are deaf to His word; yet they are blind.

How like us all the disciples are.  When confronted with the coming of death how easily we shut our eyes.  Though it draw upon us inevitably, how desperately we hold to the vanity of these passing things, unwilling to hear of the day when “the sun is darkened… and the strong men are bent… and the sound of the mill is low.”  “Man goes to his lasting home, and mourners go about the streets” – so Qoheleth paints the image of the time when “the clouds return after the rain.”  How compelling his verses are, and how ominous… and of this darkness we must hear.  It is not wise to remain blind to the passing of this life, or with it we shall die when it ends.  Though none of this should touch our souls, yet we must learn to let the body go.

O Lord, “you return man back to dust, saying, ‘Return, O children of men,’” yet you hold each of us in your loving hands.  And so we cry unto you this day, “Return, O Lord!  How long?  Have pity on your servants!”  For we wait with expectant hearts for Him who has risen from the dead to come to us again.  Let your Spirit breathe upon us now and turn this dust into the image of your Son.  May it be your Day which comes to us, even as we die.

 

*******

O LORD, we conquer death

through the death and resurrection of your Son –

be with us as we wait for His return.

YHWH, death comes inevitably to all.  It draws near to us like the setting sun.  We are mortal, the subjects of our own sin.  And so to dust we return.

But your Son has subjected Himself to this death of ours, LORD; He has undergone its torments.  In our place He has stood, and been broken for our sakes.  He who lives with you in eternity has been delivered into the hands of men and suffered the darkness upon their souls.  And so, may we not be born again?

O Jesus, you have overcome the darkness with your unending light; you have come to rescue us from falling into the well, that the clouds might not return again after the rain but that we might know new life with you in the morning after this world passes away, in the glory of your coming Day.

Help us, O LORD, to overcome our fear, to conquer the bonds of this dark place and our own mortality.  Let this not be our lasting home, but raise us to your presence that even this day we might rejoice in you. 

Direct download: BC-092912-Sa_25_OT_II.mp3
Category:Daily BreadCasts -- posted at: 12:00pm EST

(1Cor.15:12-20;   Ps.17:1,6-8,15;   Lk.8:1-3)

 

“Christ has been raised from the dead,

the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep.”

 

This is the heart of our faith.  This is the “Good News,” the Gospel preached in our midst.  This is our firm belief.  Upon it all our hopes stand.  Christ has been raised, and His disciples will follow Him.  As surely as we accompany Him here in His mission on earth, so surely will we find ourselves in His presence in heaven.  Dying in Him means rising in light.

But “if our hopes in Christ are limited to this life only, we are the most pitiable of men.”  We could then be said to have truly wasted our time, for then the very heart of our faith would have been torn out, and what but scoffing would we have to hold?  A dead Christ we would carry in our arms, and we “the deadest of the dead” with Him.

Paul speaks of this quite pointedly; he pulls no punches in this regard, declaring openly: “If Christ has not been raised, our preaching is void of content and your faith is empty too.”  Yet there are those today, as then, who “say there is no resurrection of the dead,” that “Christ was not raised” – and these would call themselves Christian.  And in the same manner there are many who do not truly believe the resurrection, yet wear the Christian nametag.  If we have doubt in our hearts, or, worse yet, if we preach against the core of the faith, what do we do but kill ourselves?  What do we do but work against the very Gospel of Christ?  And how then do we merit the name of Christian?

Brothers and sisters, we must know in our hearts and be assured that Jesus is risen from the dead.  We must realize that God has “attend[ed] to [David’s] outcry,” that He has “hearken[ed] to [his] prayer” – that the most urgent longing of our souls has been answered by the “savior of those who hope in [Him].”  With David, we of faith should say with his resolve: “On waking, I shall be content in your presence.”  Has the resurrection not been indicated in the “women who ha[ve] been cured of evil spirits and maladies” and who now accompany Jesus?  Does not Mary Magdalene, “from whom seven devils had gone out,” give clear example of hope in Christ fulfilled?  For she is not at all as she was, and this woman once so completely possessed by death itself is the first to see the Lord risen.

We must know the resurrection in our lives on earth; this is the only way we will comprehend it in heaven.  Release from sin allows us to see already the eternal fruits of the kingdom.  Accompanying Him now, our sins behind us, already upon heaven’s road we tread.  And we know of a certain we shall pass through these “towns and villages” even unto His kingdom.

 

*******

O LORD, your Son has been raised from the dead;

may we be raised with Him and be at your side.

YHWH, your Son is raised from the dead for us that we might enter your glorious presence.  Though in the shadow of the wings of the Cross on this earth we make our home, it but prepares us for the kingdom.  For even here our sins are taken away, and we come to new life in the Spirit.

We cried out to you, O LORD, and you heard our voice and sent your Son to walk among us.  And if we follow in His steps we shall come to where He leads – we shall come to you.  The path He trod must be our own, for it is the way of salvation.  Through death on the Cross we come to life, for as we die with Him so we are raised.

Let us rejoice in His resurrection, O LORD; let us have faith in the new life at work in us even this day, and look with hope to our place in your kingdom.  On waking may we look upon your face and be content in your eternal presence.  For your glory let us ever strive, giving all to you as we walk in your way.

Direct download: BC-092112-F_24_OT_II.mp3
Category:Daily BreadCasts -- posted at: 12:00pm EST

(1Cor.9:16-19,22-27;   Ps.84:2-6,8,12;   Lk.6:39-42) 

“Although I am not bound to anyone,

I made myself the slave of all so as to win over as many as possible.”

How like His Lord is Paul in his declaration, “To the weak I became a weak person with a view to winning the weak.”  For as Jesus descended from heaven to take on flesh and save those corrupted by its sin, so the Apostle has made himself “all things to all people,” stepping inside their skin “in order to save at least some of them.”  Indeed, Paul proves himself to be “on a par with his teacher” in sacrifice and fruitfulness, for how well he serves “to remove the speck from [his] brother’s eye” that he might see Jesus in the clear light of day.

The Apostle has been “entrusted with a charge,” that of “preaching the Gospel.”  And doing so willingly he finds his “recompense.”  And what is this recompense but that he receive nothing in return for his work, nothing here on earth except of course the blessing of persecution such work for the Master entails?  Then why engage in such toil, and why call others to such a life of self-sacrifice?  Ah yes, because of the “crown that is imperishable” which awaits the runner of such a race.  This heavenly blessing, too, is found when one does all “for the sake of the Gospel.”

“My heart and my flesh cry out for the living God,” our psalmist intones today, and goes on to proclaim the happiness of those “who dwell in [God’s] house.”  “Continually they praise [Him]…  They go from strength to strength,” for “grace and glory He bestows.”  This is the goal Paul has in mind when he says, “I do not run like a man who loses sight of the finish line.”  All his tribulations never distract him from his final destination; the kingdom of heaven remains ever upon his heart.  And ever does he strain forward that he and so many others might attain that crown for which “our soul yearns and pines.”

Brothers and sisters, we must “discipline [our] own body and master it”; we must “remove the plank lodged in [our] own [eye]” if we hope to join Paul in the place where “even the sparrow finds a home and the swallow a nest in which she puts her young.”  And our young we, too, must bring there – all those in our charge must know of the kingdom of God.  And so let us join Paul and our holy Lord in here becoming slaves of all, enduring our exile bravely that we might draw others to the eternal home found on the altar of the living God.

*******

O LORD, let us be led by your holy apostles

to lay down our lives with your Son,

that we might find our home in you.

YHWH, all holy hearts long for your presence, long to make their home in your house; and you send to us apostles, teachers of your way, that we might find you.  O may the vision of all be made clear to see your glory!  May all learn the lesson they need to know, taught by your Son in His sacrifice and carried on by His disciples.

We long to praise you, LORD, but there is a log in our eye that blinds us to your coming kingdom.  Help us to remove all obstruction, all distraction, all our blindness, that we might not lose sight of the blessings you offer to those who spend their lives for the sake of the Gospel.  Let us rather carry that Good News of salvation to all souls, serving to remove the specks from their eyes by your grace and mercy.  Help us to be slaves of all that all might make their home in you.  Keep us from the pit, we pray, by your guidance and secure protection.  Let us always yearn for you.

Direct download: BC-091412-F_23_OT_II.mp3
Category:Daily BreadCasts -- posted at: 12:00pm EST

(1Cor.4:9-15;   Ps.145:17-21;   Lk.6:1-5) 

“God has put us apostles at the end of the line,

like men doomed to die in the arena.”

“Up to this very hour we go hungry and thirsty, poorly clad, roughly treated, wandering about homeless,” the great Apostle Paul tells us of the persecution and slander all the Lord’s apostles must undergo.  And yet “when we are insulted we respond with a blessing,” for this is our call in the Lord: to love even our enemies, that we might show the love of God to all, that we might indeed become “a spectacle to the universe, to angels and men alike” – “fools on Christ’s account,” yet bearing all patiently that the Gospel might truly be fulfilled and the last shall be shown to be first in the eyes of God.

It is this birth to which Paul brings the Corinthians, his “beloved children.”  And though it seem a difficult fate to call down upon a people, yet we know that David’s psalm is true, that “the Lord is near to all who call upon Him, to all who call upon Him in truth”; and so through all trials He leads us and comforts us, making any suffering a light burden to bear.  And just as Paul is father to this nation, so the Father of all is there always to watch over all His children, for it is “in Christ Jesus” the Apostle has begotten them; and as He has heard the cry of His Son upon the cross and brought Him to resurrection, so “He hears [all His children] cry and saves them.”

In our gospel the Lord’s disciples are hungry, and so, in the hot sun, “walking through the standing grain” with Jesus, He feeds them: all around is food at their hands.  Truly their prayer does He answer; their need does He see.  But instead of seeing that the Lord “fulfills the desire of those who fear Him,” all the Pharisees can do is ask, “Why are you doing what is prohibited on the sabbath?”  Thus the very men who should be present to bless and comfort and guide the followers of the Holy One can but call them into the arena of persecution with the rest of the fallen world.  Thus the shepherds who are called to feed the sheep would remove the food from their hands and see them perish.  Instead of becoming apostles themselves, they become their bane.  For they cannot comprehend that God’s love transcends God’s law, that “the Lord keeps all who love Him” and this is what makes Him “just in all His ways and holy in all His works,” and not the mere precepts to which they hold so desperately, so blindly… so jealously.  Thus the chosen of God become in their eyes “the world’s refuse, the scum of all.”  And what can they be but crucified?

All must come to the holy Lord and “all flesh bless His holy name forever and ever.”  And though war be brought upon our souls, we must always “try conciliation” – peacemakers covered with blood and spittle is the state to which we are called.  No other way will the world come to know that the love of God transcends all, and all call upon Him from their hearts.

*******

O LORD, though persecuted and poor,

we are surrounded with your presence,

and so are fed in times of famine.

YHWH, you are our LORD and God; when we cry out to you, you save us.  Though we must endure persecution for your sake, though we suffer want and go hungry, you surround us with standing grain – you are ever near to help us.  Let us indeed praise your holy NAME!

What should it matter to us if we are beaten, if we are insulted and spat upon; if you are with us we are free of pain, for all these things your Son endures for our sake.  We are your children and you love us, so even these trials you turn to good.  Remain ever with us to save us by the Cross of your only Son.

He is Lord over even the Sabbath.  He has power from on high.  For you, LORD, have given all things over into His hands, and for us He does provide.  Our rest we take in Him, our food He places in our mouths – through Him we remain close to you: He is our Bread of Life.  And so, let us rejoice to walk in His way.

Direct download: BC-090812-Sa_22_OT_II.mp3
Category:Daily BreadCasts -- posted at: 12:00pm EST