The BreadCast
Daily Exposition of the Readings of Catholic Mass, from the book 'Our Daily Bread' by James H. Kurt (now with Chanted Verses, and added text of Prayer for the Day). Additional cast - SaintsCast, entries from the book 'Prayers to the Saints' (also by James Kurt). Both books bear imprimatur.

(Job 9:1-12,14-16;   Ps.88:3,10-15;   Lk.9:57-62) 

“Why, O Lord, do you reject me;

why hide from me your face?”

The cry of our psalmist certainly reflects that of Job, who in his travails asks, “How can a man be justified before God?” who realizes that the Lord “does great things past finding out” and that “should He come near [us], [we] see Him not.”  But it also reflects Jesus’ treatment of those who might follow Him, and could easily be their cry as well.

“If I appealed to Him and He answered my call, I could not believe that He would hearken to my words.”  Such a seemingly hopeless attitude may be understandable in one suffering such a plight as Job.  For he is as “the mountains [removed] before they know it”; he is shaken as “the earth out of its place.”  He is as one suddenly confounded by God, who is “wise in heart and mighty in strength.”  Before such power how can he speak, or expect to be heard?  And so, rightly in silence he must remain.  Certainly he could cry out to the Lord, “Will you work wonders for the dead?…  Do they declare your kindness in the grave, your faithfulness among those who have perished?” and in justice be saved from “the land of oblivion.”  But the test Job undergoes passes beyond justice to the suffering of the innocent before the mighty power of God.

And what of those who would be Christ’s disciples spoken of in our gospel today?  To them why does the Lord speak so severely?  Why does it seem they, too, are unable to come before His face – why does He seem to reject them?  Is He not of love, this Son of Man, unlike the judgmental God?  Does He not welcome all with open arms?  Then why such sharp words to those who approach and those He calls to “come away and proclaim the kingdom of God”?  The Lord does not reject them, but puts them to the test as He has with Job to see if their hearts are truly set upon Him alone, as indeed they must be.  It is, of course, for the great glory to which He calls them that all His disciples are chastised so vehemently.

Think not that He rejects you, brothers and sisters, when He hides His face from you.  Know that you are never hidden from Him, and that should He remove Himself from your presence, it is only to grant you clearer vision of His face.  None is more blessed than Job for none has known so fully the awesome power of God and given himself over to it so completely.  None but Christ and His followers, who give up all things, who suffer all persecutions innocently, silently, in order to know the surpassing might and tender mercy of God.  Indeed His “wonders [are] made known in darkness,” for then they most clearly shine.

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O LORD, let us follow your Son, even unto death. 

YHWH, we must give up all things to follow you; it must be your will alone we have in this world.  Even if you should put us in darkness, yet we should defer to your judgment, to your power over all things for good. 

Your Son is severe with those who would follow you, LORD, who would be as you are, as His disciples.  For what a call this is!  And how ready must we be to enter its demands.  Your reign far surpasses anything we know, anything we come to rely on in this world, and so the passing of this world – and even our own lives – we shall not mourn but learn to entrust all our cares to you. 

If the sun and the mountains are moved by you, LORD, how much more should we put ourselves in your hands.  Our trust should be so complete that we accept even your seeming rejection.  Hear our prayer and come to save us! that we might walk with your Son in your way. 

Direct download: BC-100312-W_26_OT_II.mp3
Category:Daily BreadCasts -- posted at: 12:00pm EDT